2015 Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk 10.18.15

American Cancer Society’s
2015 Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk
Join us as we help raise awareness & support to end breast cancer!
Sunday, October 18, 2015
Central Park, New York City
To Join our team or donate:
Family & Friends are welcome to join!

Race Day:
8:15AM-Team Photo at Northwest corner of 72nd Street and Fifth Avenue


NewYork-Presbyterian team T-shirts will be available. Details to follow
For additional information: Christine Dillon chw9040@nyp.org

Weill Cornell Breast Center Conducting Free Genetic Testing for BRCA1 & BRCA2

The Weill Cornell Breast Center would like to invite all patients who meet the following criteria to contact us about free genetic testing for the BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations:

  • Metastatic breast cancer
  • Her2neu negative breast cancer
  • No more than two prior regimens of chemotherapy in the metastatic setting

If you meet the criteria above, you may be eligible for free genetic testing. If you test positive for the gene mutation, you may be eligible to participate in one of our treatment trials.

Please contact Marta Cobham, RN at 212.821.0780 or mac2034@med.cornell.edu or Naomi Kornhauser, MPH at naw2007@med.cornell.edu for more information.

Awards & Honors

Dr. Eleni Andreopoulou, the Madeline and Stephen Anbinder Clinical Scholar in Hematology/Oncology and an assistant professor of clinical medicine, received the Archbishop Iakovos Leadership 100 Endowment Fund’s Award for Excellence on Feb. 14. One of the most prominent charitable Greek organizations in America, the group was founded in 1984 to bring together Greek Orthodox leaders across many fields and to support the work of other community members. Michael Jaharis, a member of the Weill Cornell Board of Overseers, is also a founding member of the fund.

Dr. Anne Moore, a professor in clinical medicine, has won the 2015 Virginia Kneeland Frantz Distinguished Women in Medicine Award from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. This award is presented annually to an alumna who has outstanding career achievements and is named in honor of Dr. Virginia Kneeland Frantz, one of the first six women allowed admission to the previously all-male college. After graduation in 1922, Dr. Krantz went on to become the first woman ever to be accepted into what was then named Presbyterian Hospital’s two-year surgical internship. Dr. Moore received the award during the college’s reunion event on May 8.

Congratulations to Drs. Andreopoulou & Moore for their continued efforts to treat women with breast cancer around the world.

Weill Cornell Physicians Selected for “Top Doctors 2015” List

Drs Vahdat, Moore, Simmons & Swistel named to Newsweek’s “Top Doctors 2015” list. The list is generated via interviewing physician peers.

“According to the NIH/National Cancer Institute, in 2015 an estimated 1,658,370 new cases of cancer will be diagnosed in the United States, and 589,430 people will die from the disease.

Newsweek, in conjunction with Castle Connolly Medical LTD, the well respected publisher of America’s Top Doctors®, is proud to present the list of the “Top Cancer Doctors 2015 ” for the United States.

This list was compiled through peer nominations and extensive research that Castle Connolly Medical LTD. has conducted for more than two decades.

The Castle Connolly physician-led research team makes tens of thousands of phone calls each year, talking with leading specialists, chairs of clinical departments and vice presidents of medical affairs, seeking to gather further information regarding the top specialists for most diseases and procedures. Each year, Castle Connolly receives nearly 100,000 nominations via this process. After a careful review of credentials, the following physicians have been selected to be a part of the Newsweek “Top Cancer Doctors 2015” list.”

To make an appointment at the Weill Cornell Breast Center please contact (212) 821-0644

Original publication http://www.newsweek.com/top-cancer-doctors-2015 

A great IDEA: Mentorship program inspires international collaboration

Khaoula Mazouzi, M.D., with her IDEA mentor Eleni Andreopoulou, M.D.

Khaoula Mazouzi, M.D., with her IDEA mentor Eleni Andreopoulou, M.D. Photo by © ASCO/David Eulitt 2015

She’s a doctor of dire diagnoses.

By the time patients are presented to Khaoula Mazouzi, M.D., most have advanced cancer, often metastasized to several sites. It is left to her to break the news – and she has about 20 minutes to do so, thanks to a caseload that has her seeing an average of 30 patients per day, in a regional hospital with just 35 beds.

The Algerian oncologist makes the most of every interaction with each patient, acting as their psychologist and advocate as well as their doctor. Long wait for a CT scan and MRI at her government-run center? As a medical school student, Mazouzi learned how to pull some strings at a private hospital. No money to pay for treatment? She quietly approached some philanthropic-minded contacts. And now, when treatments fail and all options are exhausted, she helps her patients in the final chapter of their life.

“I chose medical oncology because I wanted to improve the quality of life for cancer patients. I think I’ve succeeded in my mission so far,” Mazouzi said.

Mazouzi has been a pioneer of palliative care in Algeria, where traditionally patients were sent home to die, without any additional medical support. A young physician in the final months of her residency at Ibn Badis Hospital of Constantine, in northeast Algeria, Mazouzi received a fellowship last summer from the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), which allowed her to travel to Brussels to spend a month learning about how palliative care is delivered at the Jules Bordet Institute.

“I thought it would be very expensive and impossible to implement in Algeria, but when I went there I was shocked – there are simple medicines and affordable treatments and we can really improve the quality of life for patients,” Mazouzi said. “These patients may have failed their treatments, but they are still alive. We don’t have to just let them die. We can be with them through the end so they won’t suffer.”

The experience not only altered her approach to end-of-life care, it changed practices throughout her hospital. Upon her return, Mazouzi initiated new educational and administrative programs that she continues to lead today.

Now, she hopes to transform the landscape of cancer research in her native country, after an equally eye-opening experience at Weill Cornell Medical College.

Photo of Khaoula Mazouzi, Barbara Fiederlein, and Eleni Andreopoulou
Khaoula Mazouzi, M.D., reviews a patient’s records with clinical care nurse Barbara Fiederlein, and IDEA mentor Eleni Andreopoulou, M.D.
 As part of the Conquer Cancer Foundation’s International Development and Education Award (IDEA) mentorship program, Mazouzi participated in the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago.

Eleni Andreopoulou, M.D., was selected by ASCO to be a mentor as part of the program. Along with co-mentor Anne Moore, M.D., she hosted Mazouzi for a three-day visit at the Weill Cornell Breast Center.

The purpose of the IDEA program is to support the professional development of early-career oncologists in low- and middle-income countries around the world, Andreopoulou said. Upon the mentees’ return to their home institution, it is expected that mentors and mentees remain in contact and pursue opportunities for consultation and collaboration.

While at Weill, Mazouzi met patients and specialists in several fields, attended tumor board meetings and educational lectures, and learned about how clinical trials are conducted.

“I like the teamwork, especially the specialized, multidisciplinary tumor boards,” Mazouzi said. “We don’t have well-established tumor boards at my center. I would like to make them more multidisciplinary, and more frequent.”

But one of the highlights of the trip was a visit to the lab of Evi Giannakakou, Ph.D., and a discussion with research fellow Giuseppe Galletti. Despite a life-long dream of becoming a scientist, Mazouzi has never had the opportunity to step foot in a research laboratory.

“I now know, for certain, that this is what I’m going to do,” Mazouzi said.

Mazouzi would like to build clinical research programs in Algeria, where there is currently very little infrastructure to support it, and a dire need for even basic training to enable physicians to conduct clinical trials.

A recent surge in interest and investment in cancer care in Algeria gives her hope. In the past four years, the government has built two new regional hospitals, invested heavily in radiotherapy machines and personnel – doubling the amount of trainee doctors – and has footed the bill for many targeted therapies, including some that are quite expensive, Mazouzi said. Pharmaceutical companies have also invested in training doctors and scientists to conduct genetic testing and immunohistochemistry at specialized centers.

“I don’t think it’s impossible. It’s very possible. But we will need new government investment, training and international collaborations,” Mazouzi said.

Those collaborations could start with Weill. Mazouzi hopes to continue to work with her mentors at the Breast Center as she builds new programs at her own hospital.

Andreopoulou said she was happy to participate and was herself inspired by the ambitious young doctor.

“I think this experience was a significant opportunity to be exposed to the multidisciplinary care of patients with breast cancer and to be introduced to the principles of clinical and translational research, as well as the concept of precision medicine being pioneered at this institution,” Andreopoulou said. “This exposure will enhance her skills and perspective, and enable her to be instrumental in developing cancer care programs in her country. It’s exciting to be able to help medical oncology in the rest of the world.”

Originally published June 16, 2015 to the Meyer Cancer Center

Breast Center Team at American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting 2015 – Key Happenings!

We are excited to announce the Weill Cornell Medical College Breast Center’s contributions to the upcoming American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting next week!

Dr. Eleni Nackos (on behalf of Dr. Linda Vahdat) will be giving an oral presentation on the results from our phase 2 tetrathiomolybdate (TM) study. http://abstracts.asco.org/156/AbstView_156_151971.html

Dr. Tessa Cigler is chairing the Patient and Survivor Care session. Our abstract on cold caps was selected for a poster discussion session. http://abstracts.asco.org/156/AbstView_156_149240.html

Dr. Eleni Andreopoulou was selected by the International Development and Education Award (IDEA) group to mentor a physician from Morocco. Oncologists are selected by this group to host recipients for three-day visits following the ASCO meeting.

“The purpose of the IDEA program is to support the professional development of early-career oncologists in low- and middle-income countries around the world. The program pairs IDEA recipients with ASCO members in the United States or Canada who serve as their scientific mentors. Upon the mentees’ return to their home institution, it is expected that mentors and mentees remain in contact and pursue opportunities for consultation and collaboration.”

Dr. Anne Moore is chairing the Leadership Development Program presentation to the ASCO Board of Directors. The Leadership Development Program is a year-long program to learn leadership skills, gain exposure to the roles and mission of ASCO, and developing the future of cancer care. Dr. Moore is also joining the IDEA Working Group.

To view other abstracts from our studies:

PARP inhibitor ABT-888 http://abstracts.asco.org/156/AbstView_156_144933.html

Ovarian reserve and menses http://abstracts.asco.org/156/AbstView_156_147965.html

The METRIC study for metastatic triple negative breast cancer: http://abstracts.asco.org/156/AbstView_156_150265.html

IMMU study for metastatic triple negative breast cancer: http://abstracts.asco.org/156/AbstView_156_150673.html

Please find us on Twitter @CornellBreastCr & Facebook Weill Cornell Breast Center

Keeping Your Hair During Chemo

Dr. Tessa Cigler, a Weill Cornell oncologist involved in the cold-cap studies, said she first learned about cold caps from a patient who had researched the treatment and learned about their use in Europe. After studying the European data on cold-cap treatment, she allowed her patient to use them and became interested in conducting her own research.

The success of a cold cap treatment often depends on the duration and type of chemotherapy regimen, so not every woman is a candidate, Dr. Cigler says. In addition, cold caps are typically used only on patients with solid tumors, like breast cancer, and are not suitable for patients with blood cancers.

“Cold cap therapy is really empowering to many patients,” Dr. Cigler said. “It has allowed many patients to protect their privacy, and allows women to maintain their self-esteem and their sense of well-being during a really difficult time.”


Results: Phase I/II Study of the Antibody-Drug Conjugate Glembatumumab Vedotin in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

Dr. Linda Vahdat and her colleagues are very excited to be involved in the development of glembatumuma vedotin as it has the potential to be among the very first drugs for triple negative breast cancer.


Recently Opened Study: Triple Negative Breast Cancer Program

The Weill Cornell Breast Center recently opened a new triple negative breast cancer program. The study is for women diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer. There is an urgent need to develop new, targeted treatments for triple negative breast cancer. Through our Program, we plan to integrate research, treatment and education to accelerate and identify new targets and strategies to treat and cure triple negative breast cancer.

For more information about the study, please call Margie for a consult appointment with Dr. Vahdat at (212)-821-0644 and contact Naomi for more information at (212)-821-0984 or naw2007@med.cornell.edu.

“From a patient perspective this study requires very little of participants.  I think that for post-treatment women like me the opportunity to participate so easily in cutting edge research at a world-class institution like WCMC is a great way to ‘pay it forward’ in appreciation to all those women whose participation in past clinical trials directly benefited us in terms of improvements in how breast cancer is treated. This is an exceedingly rare opportunity!”

– Triple Negative Breast Cancer Program participant