NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital Ranked as New York Best Hospital

Earlier this week the U.S. News and World Report released their annual survey of “Best Hospitals”. NewYork Presbyterian one of the country’s largest and most comprehensive hospitals was ranked New York’s No. 1 hospital for the 16th year in a row, and No. 6 ranked hospital in all of the United States. Dr. Augustine M.K. Choi, interim dean of Weill Cornell Medicine commented,

“Our esteemed physicians and scientists at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medicine always put patients first, providing them with the finest, most comprehensive care so that they can live their healthiest lives. Together we create one of the top academic medical centers in the United States, motivated by a shared commitment: to drive excellence in healthcare and truly make a difference in New York and beyond.”

This commitment is shared by the physicians, researchers, and staff in the Weill Cornell Breast Program.

Dr. Vahdat Presents Metastatic Breast Cancer Research Update Webinar

Dr. Vahdat

Dr. Vahdat

Dr. Linda Vahdat, director of the Weill Cornell Breast Center Research Program and Chief of the Solid Tumor Service at Weill Cornell, will be presenting a metastatic breast cancer research update for Living Beyond Breast Cancer’s free webinar on
Wednesday, October 16th from 12 noon to 1 pm.

In the webinar, Dr. Vahdat will help viewers explore:

  • the latest clinical trial findings and their impact on today’s available treatment options
  • novel therapies in the research pipeline and the role they may play in future care
  • the latest understanding of what may cause metastasis and how we might prevent it in the future

Click here for more information about the free webinar. Click here to register for the webinar.

Recently Opened Study: DigniCap Cold Cap in Early Stage Breast Cancer

The Weill Cornell Breast Center has recently opened a new cold cap research study. The study is for women with early stage breast cancer who will be receiving chemotherapy that has a high probability of causing them to lose their hair.

The study sponsor is Dignitana, and the principal investigator at Weill Cornell is Dr. Tessa Cigler. For more information about the study, please call Marta Cobham, RN at (212) 821-0780 or e-mail Marta at mac2034@med.cornell.edu.

Key Eligibility

Women age 18 and older
Stage I or II breast cancer
Planned course of chemotherapy in the adjuvant or neoadjuvant setting
Plan to complete chemotherapy within 6 months
Detailed eligibility reviewed when you contact the study team

Study Details

The purpose of the study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of an experimental medical device called the DigniCap System, a cooling system designed to help prevent chemotherapy-induced hair loss. Scalp cooling works by constricting the small blood vessels around the hair follicles so that less chemotherapy reaches the follicle. Hair cells are therefore not exposed to the full dose of chemotherapy and survive the chemotherapy treatment. As a result, hair is less likely to be lost.

Study participants will wear the DigniCap cooling cap on their head for 30 minutes before starting a chemotherapy treatment, during the chemotherapy infusion and for up to 90 minutes after the infusion is finished. Participants will wear the cap for three to six hours during each chemotherapy treatment, depending on the chemotherapy regimen.

Participants will be photographed as part of the research study to assess hair loss. Participants will be seen 4 weeks after their final chemotherapy cycle, and then 3 and 6 months later for follow-up.

Click here to view all current clinical trials at the Breast Center.

 

NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Offers Single-Dose Radiotherapy for Early Stage Breast Cancer

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center recently announced that they will be the first and only hospital in the five boroughs of New York City to offer women with early stage breast cancer INTRABEAM radiotherapy, an innovative radiation treatment delivered in a single dose at the time of surgery.

Women with early stage breast cancer often have breast-conserving surgery, also called a lumpectomy, to remove a cancerous tumor. Lumpectomy is followed by a regimen of daily doses of radiation therapy to the entire breast, generally lasting six to seven weeks.

NTRABEAM radiotherapy may be an effective alternative to a six to seven week radiation regimen following surgery for select women because it allows precise  targeting of any remaining cancer cells right inside the tumor bed where the tumor is most likely to recur.

In a 10-year randomized phase 3 clinical trial of breast cancer intraoperative therapy, a single dose radiation applied at the time of surgery had the same results as the six to seven week full-breast radiation therapy.

Click here for a news article with more information about this new service. Click here for the NYP/Weill Cornell Breast Surgery website.