Breast Center Team at American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting 2015 – Key Happenings!

We are excited to announce the Weill Cornell Medical College Breast Center’s contributions to the upcoming American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting next week!

Dr. Eleni Nackos (on behalf of Dr. Linda Vahdat) will be giving an oral presentation on the results from our phase 2 tetrathiomolybdate (TM) study. http://abstracts.asco.org/156/AbstView_156_151971.html

Dr. Tessa Cigler is chairing the Patient and Survivor Care session. Our abstract on cold caps was selected for a poster discussion session. http://abstracts.asco.org/156/AbstView_156_149240.html

Dr. Eleni Andreopoulou was selected by the International Development and Education Award (IDEA) group to mentor a physician from Morocco. Oncologists are selected by this group to host recipients for three-day visits following the ASCO meeting.

“The purpose of the IDEA program is to support the professional development of early-career oncologists in low- and middle-income countries around the world. The program pairs IDEA recipients with ASCO members in the United States or Canada who serve as their scientific mentors. Upon the mentees’ return to their home institution, it is expected that mentors and mentees remain in contact and pursue opportunities for consultation and collaboration.”

Dr. Anne Moore is chairing the Leadership Development Program presentation to the ASCO Board of Directors. The Leadership Development Program is a year-long program to learn leadership skills, gain exposure to the roles and mission of ASCO, and developing the future of cancer care. Dr. Moore is also joining the IDEA Working Group.

To view other abstracts from our studies:

PARP inhibitor ABT-888 http://abstracts.asco.org/156/AbstView_156_144933.html

Ovarian reserve and menses http://abstracts.asco.org/156/AbstView_156_147965.html

The METRIC study for metastatic triple negative breast cancer: http://abstracts.asco.org/156/AbstView_156_150265.html

IMMU study for metastatic triple negative breast cancer: http://abstracts.asco.org/156/AbstView_156_150673.html

Please find us on Twitter @CornellBreastCr & Facebook Weill Cornell Breast Center

Keeping Your Hair During Chemo

Dr. Tessa Cigler, a Weill Cornell oncologist involved in the cold-cap studies, said she first learned about cold caps from a patient who had researched the treatment and learned about their use in Europe. After studying the European data on cold-cap treatment, she allowed her patient to use them and became interested in conducting her own research.

The success of a cold cap treatment often depends on the duration and type of chemotherapy regimen, so not every woman is a candidate, Dr. Cigler says. In addition, cold caps are typically used only on patients with solid tumors, like breast cancer, and are not suitable for patients with blood cancers.

“Cold cap therapy is really empowering to many patients,” Dr. Cigler said. “It has allowed many patients to protect their privacy, and allows women to maintain their self-esteem and their sense of well-being during a really difficult time.”

http://nyti.ms/1Abgsgn

Recently Opened Study: DigniCap Cold Cap in Early Stage Breast Cancer

The Weill Cornell Breast Center has recently opened a new cold cap research study. The study is for women with early stage breast cancer who will be receiving chemotherapy that has a high probability of causing them to lose their hair.

The study sponsor is Dignitana, and the principal investigator at Weill Cornell is Dr. Tessa Cigler. For more information about the study, please call Marta Cobham, RN at (212) 821-0780 or e-mail Marta at mac2034@med.cornell.edu.

Key Eligibility

Women age 18 and older
Stage I or II breast cancer
Planned course of chemotherapy in the adjuvant or neoadjuvant setting
Plan to complete chemotherapy within 6 months
Detailed eligibility reviewed when you contact the study team

Study Details

The purpose of the study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of an experimental medical device called the DigniCap System, a cooling system designed to help prevent chemotherapy-induced hair loss. Scalp cooling works by constricting the small blood vessels around the hair follicles so that less chemotherapy reaches the follicle. Hair cells are therefore not exposed to the full dose of chemotherapy and survive the chemotherapy treatment. As a result, hair is less likely to be lost.

Study participants will wear the DigniCap cooling cap on their head for 30 minutes before starting a chemotherapy treatment, during the chemotherapy infusion and for up to 90 minutes after the infusion is finished. Participants will wear the cap for three to six hours during each chemotherapy treatment, depending on the chemotherapy regimen.

Participants will be photographed as part of the research study to assess hair loss. Participants will be seen 4 weeks after their final chemotherapy cycle, and then 3 and 6 months later for follow-up.

Click here to view all current clinical trials at the Breast Center.

 

AP Article Discusses Cold Caps Research Including WCMC Breast Center

A recent Associated Press article discussed research on cold caps taking place at various research centers throughout the United States, including the Weill Cornell Breast Center. Click here to read the article.

The Weill Cornell Breast Center has an ongoing, investigator-initiated cold caps clinical trial led by Dr. Tessa Cigler. Click here to view Dr. Cigler discussing cold caps on WABC news.